An analysis of no sugar

This reach out to white settlers shows how much more dominant they are and their culture is. An interesting point to be made and investigated is the symbolism, if any, of the axe and particularly Jimmy cutting himself with the act. Davis uses dialogue to represent how the colonised react to the social situations in which they were subjugated to, on a regular basis in the early times of colonisation.

The play highlights Australian identity during the early nineteen hundreds which included racism and cricket. The ration system is designed to control the Indigenous Australians and undermine their power and independence. He also encourages the audience to recognise the unfair and hypocritical treatment.

Condescendingly and crudely, they believe that this involves lessons in basic hygiene. There being ridiculed and mistreated constantly, from the day they where invaded.

Davis lends this text to a post colonial reading through the use of characterisation. Davis uses dialogue to represent how the colonised react to the social situations in which they were subjugated to, on a regular basis in the early times of colonisation.

The characters, depending on which a reader focuses on, present differing views on the colonists. This dancing is a form of service provided by the Aboriginals, they are expressing their culture but to the people who have destroyed it.

Conflict is being set up immediately, through the Joe reading the article, and the rest of the characters response. In Translations, the English are attempting to rename areas, people, and in general make that the new dominant language, and in doing so attempt to stifle the already present Irish culture.

At very early stages of the play we see the presence of European culture being translated into the lives of indigenous Australians, with the two children playing cricket and another, Joe, reading the newspaper.

The play, No Sugar, by Western Australian Aboriginal playwright, Jack Davis, lends itself to several potential readings, with one more post-colonial perhaps the most prominent.

While this symbol of the axe may foreshadow future events it certainly reflects past events of the Aboriginal blood shed that is described as being almost justified in the paper through the supposed hardships and perils of the settlers.

This to me carries the same meaning as someone shooting themselves in the foot and indicated one to make their own life unessecisary difficult. The text begins with characters adopting a typical Australian lifestyle, with 2 characters playing cricket and the others reading the newspaper.

They cynically draw attention to the hollow rhetoric of the white officials about the values of civilisation. He wishes to cause the audience to sympathise with the characters and to portray that they where that where wronged.

He shows through the characters opposition and anger at certain actions, such as the aboriginals dancing for the brass band, that the attempts by the Australian society to integrate and absorb the indigenous into their culture as a negative, portraying it as attempt to stop aboriginals from being aboriginals.

Mr Neville is highly offensive, unreasonable and hypocritical. Mary does not want to work on a farm because many girls are raped.

Extra notes for No Sugar

At very early stages of the play we see the presence of European culture being translated into the lives of indigenous Australians, with the two children playing cricket and another, Joe, reading the newspaper.

The other two plays in the series are The Dreamers, published first inand Barungin Smell the Windpublished Davis uses the symbolism of the soap to challenge the myth of the dirty savage.

The character Jimmy on the other hand is much different and he still follows a much more structured way of things, he is seen sharpening a spear which shows that he still holds onto the previous aboriginal values.

EWon April 4, at 8: But even so, we still see Aboriginal families adopting colonizers activities. It goes without saying that there is a two-way form of racism between the colonizers and the colonized. They are also wife-molesters.

To Jimmy these dancing Aboriginals are jumping around and showing the White Australians that they want their culture back. An interactive data visualization of No Sugar's plot and themes.

We see that the loss of culture is not completely eroded due to the very nature of the language the aboriginal characters speak.

First performed inthe play deals with the struggles of the aboriginal people and oppression in which they endured by white Australian society. The text begins with characters adopting a typical Australian lifestyle, with 2 characters playing cricket and the others reading the newspaper.

The play was first performed ina period in Australian history when aboriginal rights where being fought for and sought after.Among the summaries and analysis available for No Sugar, there are 2 Short Summaries and 2 Book Reviews.

Depending on the study guide provider (SparkNotes, Shmoop, etc.), the resources below will generally offer No Sugar chapter summaries, quotes, and analysis of themes, characters, and symbols. Start studying No Sugar - Characters.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Although No Sugar only tangentially deals with this, one particularly despicable policy enacted by the government was the “child removal policy,” which took indigenous children from their families, with the intention of raising them to be as “white” and Western as possible.

Start studying No Sugar - Characters. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. No Sugar Character Analysis Jimmy serves as the voice of protest throughout the play.

Make a list of the ways Jimmy fulfills this role. In Davis’ drama the character Jimmy serves as a voice of protest against the works highlighting of discrimination against Aborigines between to Jack Davis’s play No Sugar depicts the struggle for survival by the Indigenous population during the Great Depression in Western Australia.

Set on an Aboriginal Reserve, the Munday and Millimurra families become victims of racist political manoeuvres that force them to move to the Moore River Native Settlement in the s.

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An analysis of no sugar
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