An analysis of romeo and juliet by shakespeare

That is why she is so surprised and a bit embarassed when he pops out of the bushes and says he also loves her.

He declares that if he had the name written on a piece of paper, he would tear the paper into bits. The Prince banishes Romeo from Verona for his part in the fighting and declares that Romeo will be killed if he is found within the city.

For this he has another passionate answer: By chance, Romeo comes that way. Tybalt calls him "villain," but he controls his anger at this insult out of respect to his secret new alliance with a Capulet. Her apparent willfulness compels her father to threaten the very security she is dependent upon.

Overall Story Thematic Conflict Experience vs. He doesn't mean that her kinsmen can't harm him, but that love will do anything for love -- even die -- and he is love.

As Friar Laurence hastens to the tomb to be present when Juliet awakes, there is a hope that he may arrive in time to meet Romeo and stay his death. The story is certainly sad because there are so many points at which the tragedies could have been prevented.

Romeo sees at once that an irreversible process has begun. Did you know that teen in Shakespeare's day was a word synonymous with vexation and misery? The first part of this scene, where it is revealed that Tybalt has sent a challenge to Romeo, prepares us for the crossing of the feud action and love action.

After this tragic ending of the love action and the feud action, the Friar explains the marriage and intrigue. One can imagine Romeo coming a bit back down to earth no pun intended as he besottedly gazes up at Juliet posing in the moonlight.

Juliet shows wonderful self-control in her meeting with Paris at the Friar's cell, but after he has gone her anguish finds full expression. Again accident has proved the enemy of the lovers, for just as the messenger was about to depart for Mantua, the doors of the house at which he stayed were sealed because of the pestilence.

The acts of smiling and frowning are actions performed by people, which makes the example personification.

Entering the tomb, Romeo sees Juliet, who is still in her death-like sleep. A glooming peace this morning with it brings. Romeo's mention of sick and green in this line owes to the Renaissance belief that women who protractedly maintained their virginity were subject to green-sickness, so named because of a form of anemia that could affect young women known medically as chlorosis, in which the skin actually takes on a greenish cast due to a significant hemoglobin deficiency.

They also swear to raise two beautiful statues in Verona's town square as monuments to their children.

The reference to the "envious moon" is a double entendre. For never was a story of more woe This story of Juliet and Romeo is the saddest story that has ever been told- there has never been a story that is this sad.

In Act III, Scene 5, Capulet demands his right as her father to marry her to Paris, threatening her with disinheritance and public shame.

The Prince warns that if anyone from either family disturbs the peace again, they will be killed. By chance, again, Juliet in her confession of love to the heavens and the night is overheard by her lover himself, and he comes to her call.

The sun for sorrow will not show his head. Romeo asks Juliet to appear "Arise, fair sun" at her window. On the figurative level, "vestal livery" represents Juliet's virginity; Romeo has designs on her doffing that as well—all in the name of preventive health, of course, as mentioned above.

The interwoven imagery and subtext of this passage is quite remarkable under close examination. Unaware of the relationship between Romeo and Juliet, Paris assumes that Romeo is merely a Montague trying to defile the Capulet graves. The scene ends with the significant words: Desire What Romeo covets undermines his efforts—evidenced in his desire for Rosaline: An interesting hypothesis is that perhaps Shakespeare originally had Juliet complete the line as if to herself, which might have prompted Romeo to speak his next line.

Finally, Prince Escalus appears and breaks up the brawl, condemning the families for allowing their long-standing feud to incite violence yet again.

Romeo and Juliet: Prologue Analysis, Line by Line

Romeo begins in straightforward iambic pentameterwith stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable. Although he can't hear her, he's certain that she's seen him. Buying poison, he comes to the vault to have a last sight of Juliet.There are literary hundreds of examples of literary devices used in Romeo and Juliet.

Here are a few of them. The Prologue is an example of a sonnet and, therefore, the last two lines of the. Plot Analysis. Romeo and Juliet is a play about the conflict between the main characters’ love, with its transformative power, and the darkness, hatred, and selfishness represented by their families’ feud.

The two teenaged lovers, Romeo and Juliet, fall in love the first time they see each other, but their families’ feud requires they remain enemies.

Romeo and Juliet: Epilogue Analysis

A summary of Themes in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Romeo and Juliet and what it means.

Romeo and Juliet

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. An analysis of the five stages of plot development in Romeo and Juliet - exposition, complication, rising action, denouement, from Shakespeare Online.

Romeo and Juliet study guide contains a biography of William Shakespeare, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

About Romeo and Juliet. Plot Analysis. Romeo and Juliet is a play about the conflict between the main characters’ love, with its transformative power, and the darkness, hatred, and selfishness represented by their families’ feud.

The two teenaged lovers, Romeo and Juliet, fall in love the first time they see each other, but their families’ feud requires they remain enemies.

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An analysis of romeo and juliet by shakespeare
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